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BOXING TRIVIA AND FUN STORIES

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Where you can find funny things happened in boxing. Please enjoy or send e-mail if you have stories

LOVE STORY
One day in 1885, Ned Donnelly, a boxing trainer and promotor and also an ex boxer, left his gym with his girlfriend. Suddenly a robber attacked him, but as an ex boxer he easily ko’d the robber. When he took a rest after the duel, the robber woke up and tried to attack again. This time, Donnelly’s girlfriend smashed the robber with the heel of her shoes. Being impressed with his girlfriend's fighting skills, Donnely then married her. What a love story!

THE MOST HORRIBLE NICKNAME
Oscar de la Hoya is known as "The Golden Boy", Mike Tyson is "The Iron" and Evander Holyfield is "Real Deal". Stephen Oliver has a horrible nickname "The Death"; not because he always kills his opponents in the ring, but because his skin which is very pale, like a dead man!

BOXING DOESN’T MEAN A BUSINESS ABILITY
John CONTEH, the former light heavyweight champion of the world opened a restaurant called "JC" which could stand for either his name or Julius Caesar the Roman Emperor. But the restaurant had only a few customers. Even 1n 1981 Conteh was fined 100 poundsterling after he threw one of his waiters to the tables. A year later, he went bancrupt.

BOXING SOMETIMES MEANS MILITARY CAREER
John Ebenezer Samuel de Graft-Hayward, being successful both in the ring and his military career. In 1935, he became a welterweight amateur boxing champion in West Africa. Six years later he became the champion of middleweight. In his professional career he was ring named Chocolate Kid. After he retired from the ring, he joined the air force. When Ghana proclaimed as a country in 1957, he was a lieutenant colonel. Not long afterwards, he was a wing commodore. A good carrer!

BOXING SOMETIMES MEANS STUDY
Kid Wedge fought in 70 pro bouts. In the age of 40, he retired and studied in a university. Then he was appointed as a Religion Ministry and a Professor of biology in University of Pasadena. Very nice one, right?

MOST KNOCKDOWNS
Vic Toweel (South Africa) made a record as the most knockdown in one bout. Danny Sullivan (UK) was knocked down 14 (fourteen) times in a 10 round bantamweight bout in Johannesburg, South Africa, December 2, 1950. (The Guiness Book of World Records).

HIT BY THE HEAT
In 1952, Charlie Hopkins quit in the duel against Fred Guerro in Miami, US in round 2. The rumble was done in an open stadium. Hopkins didn’t quit because of Guerro’s punches, but he felt the sunshine in the open stadium was too hot for him!

BOXING GHOST
In 1923, George Cook (Australian heavyweight fighter) was hit badly by Frank Goodard in the ring, though he finally won the fight. With blood over Cook’s face, his friend took Cook to home, and knocking the door for him. Somebody, not his parents, opened the door and escaped. He thought Cook was a ghost with the blood over his face!

BOXER RECORDS FASTEST KO
LONDON (Reuters): A boxer has knocked his opponent out in 13 seconds, including the referee's count of 10, to record the fastest knock-out victory in British history.

Daniel James, a 23-year-old stable lad connected with a perfect left hook on and floored Steve Tuckett on Saturday to extend his record to 10 professional wins.

The light-welterweight told Tuesday's Racing Post: "I got off my stool and... just threw the punch. It hit Steve flush on the chin, he went down flat on his back and I knew at once that it was a good one."

In 1989, the referee of a British fight between Eugene Brown and Ian Bockers stopped the contest after 10 seconds.

Bockers had been knocked down but got up after a six count before the referee decided he was unable to continue. (Jeff)

THE LONGEST FIGHT
The longest fight in history was recorded in the fight between James Kelly and Jack Smith in Fierry Creek, Dalesford, Victoria, Australia on December 3, 1855. The bareknucle fight ended in 6 hours and 15 minutes. The winner is unknown. (Source: The Guiness Book of Records 1998)

NON US HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONS
Bob Fitzimmons (England, 1896, 1897-1899 - World Champion)
Georges Charpentier (France, 1914 - World Champion)
Max Schmelling (Germany, 1930-1932, World Champion)
Primo Carnera (Italy, 1933-1934, World Champion)
Ingemar Johansson (Sweden, 1959-1960, World Champion)
Gerrie Coetzee (South Africa, 1983-1984, WBA)
Trevor Berbick (Canada, 1986, WBC)
Frank Bruno (England, 1995-1996, WBC)
Frans Botha (South Africa, 1995-1996, IBF)
Lennox Lewis (England, 1992-1994, 1999, WBC/WBA/IBF)
John Ruiz (Puerto Rico, WBA - The first Puerto Rican for the heavweight world titlist)

SAVED BY THE MOTHER
In Southhampton, England on September 9, 1989, Tony Wilson fought Steve McCarthy. On the third round Wilson was knocked down and he was able to get up before the 8th count. He was then bombarded by McCarthy on the rope. The referee seemed to stop the fight by TKO, but wait... a lady, later known as Milna Wilson, Tony Wilson's mother, entered the ring and smashed his son's opponent's head twice with her high heeled shoes.

The referee suspended the fight for awhile to let the security guard Mina Wilson get out from the ring, then asked both fighters to continue the fight. Shocked and confused, McCarthy refused to continue the fight which made the referee decide Tony Wilson's victory by TKO in round 3.

"Thanks, Mom...," said Wilson.

Jeff from many sources.

Southpaw
Southpaw has its origins in 1880s' baseball slang. Baseball diamonds were often arranged so the batters would face east, to avoid looking into the afternoon sun. The pitcher's left hand, or paw, would therefore be on the southern side. (www.worldorigins.org) – (Jeff)

WELTERWEIGHT
This is about the origin of the word "Welterweight" associated with the division in boxing:
welter - early 14c., from M.Du. or M.L.G. welteren "to roll," from P.Gmc. *waltijanan, from base *wal-, *wel- "roll." The noun meaning "confused mass" is first recorded 1851.
welterweight - 1832, "heavyweight horseman," later "boxer or wrestler of a certain weight" (1896), from earlier welter "heavyweight horseman or boxer" (1804), possibly from welt (v.) "beat severely." (http://www.geocities.com/etymonline/) – (Jeff)

BANTAMWEIGHT
We all know the word “Bantam” refers to a small fowl (like mini chicken) which is associated to small people in English language, which then became one of the lightest weights in boxing. However, not many people know that the word “bantam” comes after "Bantam", former Dutch residency in Java, from which the small domestic fowl were said to have been first imported (1740’s). (http://www.geocities.com/etymonline/). The former Bantam residency is now called "Banten" Province belongs to Indonesia after its independence in 1945 from the Dutch colony – (Jeff)

More new stories go to: Boxing Trivia Page 1, Boxing Trivia Page 2,

Do you have similar stories or Trivia Links? Then send me by e-mail Also enjoy these links:
Boxing Trivia Quiz
Monthly Boxing Trivia Quiz
Boxing King of Sport's Gerald's Trivia Corner
Rockmall Trivia Challenge - Boxing
Rock Mall's
Trivia Challenge

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